Posted on by MLVEDA MCP

Let’s have a look at the Bare-Knuckle fights’ champions from 19th century to last it was played by the John L. Sullivan against Jake Kilrain for the last official Bareknuckle Championship of the world under the Prize Ring Rules on July 8, 1889.

 

19th Century – Best Bare-Knuckle Fighters

Jem Belcher [1800 – 1803]

Jem Belcher was the talented young fighter and the first champion of the 19th century. He was the Grandson of the infamous Jack Slack, Belcher held the champion title for three years and then he had been forced to be pensioned off after losing sight in one eye playing rackets.

Hen Pearce [1804 – 1806]

Hen Pearce was known as the Game Chicken because of his legendary courage. He was also enforced to retire early when a tempestuous marriage forced him to drink.

John Gully [1807 – 1808]

Gully at first lost to Hen Pearce after six rounds when the Pearce bought the Gully out of defaulter’s jail so they could fight. Regardless of losing, he was ranked as the champion after Pearce’s superannuation.

Tom Cribb [1809 – 1822]

Tom Cribb was understood by many as the greatest fighter of his time. He held the bare-knuckle championship title for a number of years previously retiring to own a London pub. He had two most famed fights against Tom Molineaux. Tom Molineaux was an ex-slave and a challenging fighter who was the first American to challenge for this title, nonetheless he was beaten by Cribb in both bouts.

Tom Spring [1823 – 1824]

Tom Spring was a student of Tom Cribb and he got retired after one year as champion, even though he had numerous wins and only one loss in that time.

Tom Cannon [1824 – 1825]

Tom Cannon was the one who got the unoccupied title after Tom Spring’s retirement. He then lost the title after an year in an classic show down with Jem Ward.

Jem Ward [1825 – 1832]

He was known as The Black Diamond and he lost the title to Peter Crawley in 1827, but he retired immediately after letting Jem Ward to keep the title. He also visited USA a short time before self-effacing in 1832.

James Burke [1833 – 1839]

Burke was recognized for his devastating punch and was labeled with the name the Deaf ‘un because he has hearing weakened. His challenger for the untaken title, Simon Ward, passed away due to continuous injuries in their fight.

William Thompson [1839 – 1840]

Recognized as Bendigo, Thompson was a mobster whose friends often used to threaten his challengers. He made James Burke lost, but soon after that he retired and left the previous champion Burke and Ben Caunt both having the title.

Nick Ward [1841]

Nick was the younger brother of former champion Jem Ward. He fought both of the main competitors and claimed champions, James Burke and Ben Caunt, and made them lose on a foul conclusion.

Ben Caunt [1841 – 1845]

Caunt beat Nick Ward in another game to claim the title. Further, he went on to lose it to past champion William Bendigo Thompson, who again shattered him for the third time to re-claim his champion title. After a demanding ninety-three rounds, Caunt was banned for going down without getting hit. After that he retired from the ring.

William Thompson [1845 – 1850]

However, Thompson detained the title for five years after coming out of his withdrawal. William defended it once in a fight he won against his rival, Tom Paddock, who got barred for hitting him when he was down. After he got retired, he turned into an evangelist pastor and got the peculiarities of having a race horse called after him, a town in Australia acquired his name too and he was also the theme of a poem by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

William Perry [1850 – 1851]

He was acknowledged as the Tipton Slasher. Won the available champion title by thrashing Tom Paddock. But he lost the title a year later to Harry Broome. And both of these bouts were concluded on a foul.

Harry Broom [1851 – 1856]

Broome lost the bare-knuckle boxing title because he declined to give another game to William Perry, whom he had crushed on a foul.

Tom Paddock [1856 – 1858]

After losing title submissions to William Thompson and William Parry, Paddock finally accomplished his dream of becoming the champion.

Tom Sayers [1858 – 1860]

Sayers got the champion title by thrashing the expert Tom Paddock. Sayers so was used to beating much heavier men than himself so it was not a big deal for him. However, after a hard draw with American John C Heenan in which he fought many of the forty-two rounds with a critically injured arm, Sayers withdrew from bareknuckle boxing.

Sam Hurst [1860 – 1861]

Hurst was another fighter who thrashed Tom Paddock in a title fight, but he lost it on his first title defense in which he clashed counter to Jem Mace.

Jem Mace [1861 – 1862]

Jem Mace toured the world with his boxing Booth approving all new comers. However, he lost his title to Tom King after firstly beating him in their first challenge.  

Tom King [1862 – 1863]

Tom King claimed the champion title after 21 rounds against Jem Mace. He then became the second champion to retire after fighting John C Heenan, after a hard fight of two round battle.

Jem Mace [1866 – 1871]

After initially gaining and losing the champion title as a bare-knuckle boxer, Mace was one of the first celebrity fighters to shift to using boxing gloves in the ring after the introduction of the Queensbury Rules. Even though after his withdrawal, he constantly visited with his stall and became an effective supporter.

 

Hand Training Is Must for Bare-Knuckle Boxing

Today’s modern-day gloved boxers don’t have the difficulties of injury to their hands and wrists as much as a Bareknuckle Boxer has. But as bare-knuckle boxing is gaining momentum many fighters are wishing to take this combat sport up are asking how to evade and limit possible harm.

But they first need to learn how to throw punches correctly and how to target the softer body parts of an opponent. Therefore, lets get to the basics first and learn differences between punching without the protection of gloves. You will also need to read up on the structure of the human body as adept in most martial arts. Intend to throw precise and effective punches and consequently minimize the probabilities of damage to yourself.

Remember that in bare knuckle boxing, there are possibilities that your hands will hurt anyway even if you use the correct methods and hit at precise spots. That is why, it is then needed to prepare your hands beforehand fighting as this will surely help.

Press Ups

As every training starts slowly and then progressively build the strength up over a period of time. Same is the idea here, the purpose is to root for calluses on the knuckles which will result in hardening the skin itself. You can do this by carrying out press ups on several surfaces starting from old carpet and working up to tangible and even polished floor. Furthermore, this workout will put pressure on the bones themselves which can make them solider due to the body’s natural restoration arrangement and not as much of disposed to harm.  

Punch into Sand Buckets

Next, attempt to punch into buckets filled with sand by your stretched knuckles. This too is to cause toughening of the skin of hand and after a while as your hands become more adapted to it you can begin to add grit to the sand, which will increase the crudeness by time.

Hit Punching Bags

Regularly start with exposed fist and use this punching bag practice to not only toughen the skin but to make sure you punch right and effectively using your knuckles. Various combat sports have several procedures of toughening the bones and muscles of the hands, this varies from punching trees and rocks and using boards enfolded in rope to punch and that is similar to Makiwara boards used in Muay Thai. Also get familiar to making a solid fist to halt harm as there will be less movement in the fingers when hitting the target.

There are also lots of fighters who soak their hands in various mixtures and potions. Among these the most common is Brine solution. However, some fighters even use petrol, which we will not overlook lest you want to get skin irritation.

In 2019, here we are again having a discussion about bare-knuckle fighting. Many people have compared bare-knuckle fighting to street fighting. But there is a difference. The difference between the two is one simple thing, and that is rules. Still, bare-knuckle fighting is a combat fight in its purest form. Two men stand in a ring just few feet from each other going with nothing shielding them, means without any protective gear. No hand wraps or filling means no forgiveness. The fighters simply use a little gauze under the wrap that barely protects their hands. Everything else is exposed and as the name suggests, bare knuckle fighting.

Let’s have a look at the Bare-Knuckle fights’ champions from 19th century to last it was played by the John L. Sullivan against Jake Kilrain for the last official Bareknuckle Championship of the world under the Prize Ring Rules on July 8, 1889.

 

19th Century – Best Bare-Knuckle Fighters

Jem Belcher [1800 – 1803]

Jem Belcher was the talented young fighter and the first champion of the 19th century. He was the Grandson of the infamous Jack Slack, Belcher held the champion title for three years and then he had been forced to be pensioned off after losing sight in one eye playing rackets.

Hen Pearce [1804 – 1806]

Hen Pearce was known as the Game Chicken because of his legendary courage. He was also enforced to retire early when a tempestuous marriage forced him to drink.

John Gully [1807 – 1808]

Gully at first lost to Hen Pearce after six rounds when the Pearce bought the Gully out of defaulter’s jail so they could fight. Regardless of losing, he was ranked as the champion after Pearce’s superannuation.

Tom Cribb [1809 – 1822]

Tom Cribb was understood by many as the greatest fighter of his time. He held the bare-knuckle championship title for a number of years previously retiring to own a London pub. He had two most famed fights against Tom Molineaux. Tom Molineaux was an ex-slave and a challenging fighter who was the first American to challenge for this title, nonetheless he was beaten by Cribb in both bouts.

Tom Spring [1823 – 1824]

Tom Spring was a student of Tom Cribb and he got retired after one year as champion, even though he had numerous wins and only one loss in that time.

Tom Cannon [1824 – 1825]

Tom Cannon was the one who got the unoccupied title after Tom Spring’s retirement. He then lost the title after an year in an classic show down with Jem Ward.

Jem Ward [1825 – 1832]

He was known as The Black Diamond and he lost the title to Peter Crawley in 1827, but he retired immediately after letting Jem Ward to keep the title. He also visited USA a short time before self-effacing in 1832.

James Burke [1833 – 1839]

Burke was recognized for his devastating punch and was labeled with the name the Deaf ‘un because he has hearing weakened. His challenger for the untaken title, Simon Ward, passed away due to continuous injuries in their fight.

William Thompson [1839 – 1840]

Recognized as Bendigo, Thompson was a mobster whose friends often used to threaten his challengers. He made James Burke lost, but soon after that he retired and left the previous champion Burke and Ben Caunt both having the title.

Nick Ward [1841]

Nick was the younger brother of former champion Jem Ward. He fought both of the main competitors and claimed champions, James Burke and Ben Caunt, and made them lose on a foul conclusion.

Ben Caunt [1841 – 1845]

Caunt beat Nick Ward in another game to claim the title. Further, he went on to lose it to past champion William Bendigo Thompson, who again shattered him for the third time to re-claim his champion title. After a demanding ninety-three rounds, Caunt was banned for going down without getting hit. After that he retired from the ring.

William Thompson [1845 – 1850]

However, Thompson detained the title for five years after coming out of his withdrawal. William defended it once in a fight he won against his rival, Tom Paddock, who got barred for hitting him when he was down. After he got retired, he turned into an evangelist pastor and got the peculiarities of having a race horse called after him, a town in Australia acquired his name too and he was also the theme of a poem by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

William Perry [1850 – 1851]

He was acknowledged as the Tipton Slasher. Won the available champion title by thrashing Tom Paddock. But he lost the title a year later to Harry Broome. And both of these bouts were concluded on a foul.

Harry Broom [1851 – 1856]

Broome lost the bare-knuckle boxing title because he declined to give another game to William Perry, whom he had crushed on a foul.

Tom Paddock [1856 – 1858]

After losing title submissions to William Thompson and William Parry, Paddock finally accomplished his dream of becoming the champion.

Tom Sayers [1858 – 1860]

Sayers got the champion title by thrashing the expert Tom Paddock. Sayers so was used to beating much heavier men than himself so it was not a big deal for him. However, after a hard draw with American John C Heenan in which he fought many of the forty-two rounds with a critically injured arm, Sayers withdrew from bareknuckle boxing.

Sam Hurst [1860 – 1861]

Hurst was another fighter who thrashed Tom Paddock in a title fight, but he lost it on his first title defense in which he clashed counter to Jem Mace.

Jem Mace [1861 – 1862]

Jem Mace toured the world with his boxing Booth approving all new comers. However, he lost his title to Tom King after firstly beating him in their first challenge.  

Tom King [1862 – 1863]

Tom King claimed the champion title after 21 rounds against Jem Mace. He then became the second champion to retire after fighting John C Heenan, after a hard fight of two round battle.

Jem Mace [1866 – 1871]

After initially gaining and losing the champion title as a bare-knuckle boxer, Mace was one of the first celebrity fighters to shift to using boxing gloves in the ring after the introduction of the Queensbury Rules. Even though after his withdrawal, he constantly visited with his stall and became an effective supporter.

 

Hand Training Is Must for Bare-Knuckle Boxing

Today’s modern-day gloved boxers don’t have the difficulties of injury to their hands and wrists as much as a Bareknuckle Boxer has. But as bare-knuckle boxing is gaining momentum many fighters are wishing to take this combat sport up are asking how to evade and limit possible harm.

But they first need to learn how to throw punches correctly and how to target the softer body parts of an opponent. Therefore, lets get to the basics first and learn differences between punching without the protection of gloves. You will also need to read up on the structure of the human body as adept in most martial arts. Intend to throw precise and effective punches and consequently minimize the probabilities of damage to yourself.

Remember that in bare knuckle boxing, there are possibilities that your hands will hurt anyway even if you use the correct methods and hit at precise spots. That is why, it is then needed to prepare your hands beforehand fighting as this will surely help.

Press Ups

As every training starts slowly and then progressively build the strength up over a period of time. Same is the idea here, the purpose is to root for calluses on the knuckles which will result in hardening the skin itself. You can do this by carrying out press ups on several surfaces starting from old carpet and working up to tangible and even polished floor. Furthermore, this workout will put pressure on the bones themselves which can make them solider due to the body’s natural restoration arrangement and not as much of disposed to harm.  

Punch into Sand Buckets

Next, attempt to punch into buckets filled with sand by your stretched knuckles. This too is to cause toughening of the skin of hand and after a while as your hands become more adapted to it you can begin to add grit to the sand, which will increase the crudeness by time.

Hit Punching Bags

Regularly start with exposed fist and use this punching bag practice to not only toughen the skin but to make sure you punch right and effectively using your knuckles. Various combat sports have several procedures of toughening the bones and muscles of the hands, this varies from punching trees and rocks and using boards enfolded in rope to punch and that is similar to Makiwara boards used in Muay Thai. Also get familiar to making a solid fist to halt harm as there will be less movement in the fingers when hitting the target.

There are also lots of fighters who soak their hands in various mixtures and potions. Among these the most common is Brine solution. However, some fighters even use petrol, which we will not overlook lest you want to get skin irritation.

In 2019, here we are again having a discussion about bare-knuckle fighting. Many people have compared bare-knuckle fighting to street fighting. But there is a difference. The difference between the two is one simple thing, and that is rules. Still, bare-knuckle fighting is a combat fight in its purest form. Two men stand in a ring just few feet from each other going with nothing shielding them, means without any protective gear. No hand wraps or filling means no forgiveness. The fighters simply use a little gauze under the wrap that barely protects their hands. Everything else is exposed and as the name suggests, bare knuckle fighting.